You must not reduce yourself to a puddle just because the person you like is afraid to swim and you are a fierce sea to them; because there will be someone who was born with love of the waves within their blood, and they will look at you with fear and respect.

T.B. LaBerge // Things I’m Still Learning at 25 (via tblaberge)

(via odixx)

i’m at a point in my life where everything is falling apart and everything is coming together at the same time.

gorilllas:

@myself what the fuck are you doing

(via conduitbioterrorist)

yoursly:

Angelina Jolie at the 56th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1999) 

(via itisy0urs)

lazyyogi:

The world you tune into also tunes into you. 

(via universeobserver)

Make the first move, tell people how you feel, stop being so scared of rejection, stop feeling so engulfed with thoughts that aren’t even yours, and stop wasting your fucking time.

What I needed to hear (via tea-storm)

(via anditslove)

all-aamerican:

alwayssunny11:

*grins~

Relationship goals

(via p2714)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. 

This poem reminds me of my Mom, who taught me the power in the word “No” and let me use that power, even towards her.  I am my own person first, and her daughter second, but I am most grateful to be her daughter. The daughter who’s favorite word is “no”.

(via featherandarrow)

(via lattesandlaughter)

nativelynative:

Alejandro Cartagena captured Mexican workers on their way to job sites in Car Poolers. This is such an amazing and simple photo series. 

(via p2714)

readyforthe-revolution:

disciplesofmalcolm:

Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture)

"Dr. King’s policy was that nonviolence would achieve the gains for black people in the United States. His major assumption was that if you are nonviolent, if you suffer, your opponent will see your suffering and will be moved to change his heart. That’s very good.

He only made one fallacious assumption: In order for nonviolence to work, your opponent must have a conscience. The United States has none.”

(via lattesandlaughter)

It’s dark because you are trying too hard. Lightly child, lightly. Learn to do everything lightly. Yes, feel lightly even though you’re feeling deeply. Just lightly let things happen and lightly cope with them. I was so preposterously serious in those days…Lightly, lightly—it’s the best advice ever given me. So throw away your baggage and go forward. There are quicksands all about you, sucking at your feet, trying to suck you down into fear and self-pity and despair. That’s why you must walk so lightly. Lightly, my darling.

Aldous Huxley, Words I Needed To Tell Myself (via acupofkeen)

(via anditslove)

outofprintclothing:

Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley!

(via langleav)

Those who love you are not fooled by mistakes you have made, or by dark images you hold about yourself. They remember your beauty when you feel ugly; your wholeness when you are broken; your innocence when you feel guilty; and your purpose when you are confused.

Alan Cohen  (via ittybitty-world)

(via ittybitty-world)

(via mxelishv)

I will allow space for all the feelings my heart holds. I will not cower or hide from myself. It’s okay to feel the ugly messy things. It’s okay to feel the burning brilliance of beauty. It’s okay to feel the soft winds of happiness and the quiet bursts of loneliness. Its okay to feel it all. It’s okay to be myself, all of myself, not just the good.